Blogtrotters

Showing posts with label reggae. Show all posts
Showing posts with label reggae. Show all posts

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Baaro - Rhythm City [1997] [ethiopia]










          After fleeing their homeland of Ethiopia in the late '70s to avoid conflict with the Marxist government, a trio of reggae musicians made their way to the United States. Landing in Chicago, the three musicians began playing their African and Jamaican-flavored jams in reggae clubs around the city.

        Fronted by singer/guitarist Mulu Gessesse, the band consisted of Mulu's brother Zeleke Gessesse and close friend Meluka Retts.

      In 1980, the band assumed the name Dallol, and put together a demo tape. Dallol gained a sizable following in Chicago quickly with its distinct Ethiopian-flavored sound.

      The demo soon found its way all over the country, outside of the United States, across the Caribbean and into the hands of a certain famous family in Jamaica.

       "It was 1981, right after Bob (Marley) died," Mulu recalled. "Our tape made its way to Rita (Marley), and she asked us to go on down to Jamaica. That was our first contact with the Marleys."












            Contacts with the first family of reggae proved to be a good thing for Dallol. Rita Marley produced the band's first full-length album and helped the band out in a number of ways. Lodging and other commodities were provided to Dallol by the Marleys as the band made its tour of the islands.

         It wasn't long before the Marleys became more than contacts, with friendships forming between Dallol and Bob's son, Ziggy Marley.

"Ziggy was only 10 years old when we met him," Mulu explained. "As a matter of fact, he played his first show with us."

            Good ties with the Marleys continued, and soon Dallol was asked to tour with Ziggy's newly formed band "Ziggy and the Melody Makers." Dallol's Ethiopian and reggae roots served as a perfect backdrop to Ziggy's continuation of his father's style and heartfelt messages.

           In the late '80s, Dallol toured and recorded with Ziggy. The result of the combined effort was heard worldwide. One platinum and one gold album elevated Dallol to superstar status in the reggae industry.

         "That experience was great because it enabled us to go all over the world," Mulu said.

          After about five years with Marley, Dallol returned to its second home in Chicago. Included in the move were a couple line change ups and a change of name for the group. Upon the addition of three more members, including two female vocalists, Dallol changed its name to Baaro.

            Since moving back to Chicago, Baaro has made many national, as well as international, media appearances.

     Included in Baaro's impressive list of accomplishments are appearances on David Letterman, Soul Train, the NAACP Image Awards, BBC and the Arsenio Hall Show. Baaro's most recent television appearance was a slot on the Oprah Winfrey Show three weeks ago.

          The band has continued doing what it does best. Recording three CDs (one in 1986, 1991 and this year's "Rhythm City"), Baaro has greatly expanded its fan base, particularly in the Midwest.

         "Everywhere we go, we are getting very positive reactions, and they love our arrangements, melodies and harmonies," Mulu said. "Every new place we go to, they keep wanting us to come back. Our base has been expanding all the time. Colleges, especially, have responded very well. The last time we came to Ames, we had a wonderful party. The action and response was incredible. The same thing is happening everywhere we go."

         "Rhythm City" captures Baaro's long and eventful career by staying true to the sounds of Dallol but also adding depth with the addition of the newest members.

         Capturing the bands message of togetherness, love of all people and unity, the album also stays true to reggae roots.

      "I think the newest album reflects our experience," Mulu said. "You'll obviously hear reggae, and you'll also hear some of our Ethiopian background. It's a blend of Africa, Jamaica and urban-American music."

         The album draws on a number of musical influences, including Bob Marley, Stevie Wonder, singers from Africa and South Africa, as well as pop melody influences from the Beatles.

        Being able to play music for a career has proven to be a fulfilling thing for Baaro.

       "Music gives me a medium for me to express my inner feelings," Mulu said. "Any time I get inspired about a certain idea or a certain feeling, I just go sit down and play my guitar. I'm able to transform that abstract thought into music. Seeing the finished product with the band and then recording and listening to it gives me an incredible feeling."




Baaro - 01 - Nanye (3:59)
Baaro - 02 - No More (4:25)
Baaro - 03 - Music (4:48)
Baaro - 04 - Ashema (3:11)
Baaro - 05 - My Only One Girl (4:08)
Baaro - 06 - I Ain't Got Nothing (4:39)
Baaro - 07 - Drift Away (4:28)
Baaro - 08 - Rhythm City (3:52)
Baaro - 09 - Ebolala (3:37)
Baaro - 10 - One Night Feeling (4:06)




Thursday, February 23, 2017

Dallol - Land Of The Genesis [1985] [usa+eth]













Dallol - Reggae In The Moonlight




              After fleeing their homeland of Ethiopia in the late ’70s to avoid conflict with the Marxist government, a trio of reggae musicians made their way to the United States.
         Landing in Chicago, the three musicians began playing their African and Jamaican-flavored jams in reggae clubs around the city.
Fronted by singer/guitarist Mulu Gessesse, the band consisted of Mulu’s brother Zeleke Gessesse and close friend Meluka Retts.

           In 1980, the band assumed the name Dallol, and put together a demo tape. Dallol gained a sizable following in Chicago quickly with its distinct Ethiopian-flavored sound. The demo soon found its way all over the country, outside of the United States, across the Caribbean and into the hands of a certain famous family in Jamaica.

           “It was 1981, right after Bob (Marley) died,” Mulu recalled. “Our tape made its way to Rita (Marley), and she asked us to go on down to Jamaica. That was our first contact with the Marleys.”










    
           Contacts with the first family of reggae proved to be a good thing for Dallol. Rita Marley produced the band’s first full-length album and helped the band out in a number of ways. Lodging and other commodities were provided to Dallol by the Marleys as the band made its tour of the islands.

         It wasn’t long before the Marleys became more than contacts, with friendships forming between Dallol and Bob’s son, Ziggy Marley. “Ziggy was only 10 years old when we met him,” Mulu explained. “As a matter of fact, he played his first show with us.”

          Good ties with the Marleys continued, and soon Dallol was asked to tour with Ziggy’s newly formed band “Ziggy and the Melody Makers.” Dallol’s Ethiopian and reggae roots served as a perfect backdrop to Ziggy’s continuation of his father’s style and heartfelt messages.

         In the late ’80s, Dallol toured and recorded with Ziggy. The result of the combined effort was heard worldwide. One platinum and one gold album elevated Dallol to superstar status in the reggae industry.
“That experience was great because it enabled us to go all over the world,” Mulu said.

       After about five years with Marley, Dallol returned to its second home in Chicago. Included in the move were a couple line change ups and a change of name for the group. Upon the addition of three more members, including two female vocalists, Dallol changed its name to Baaro.




Zeleke GessesseBass, Vocals
Ruphael Wolde MariamDrums, Vocals, Cover
Dereje MekonnenKeyboards
Mulaku RettaKeyboards, Vocals
Abdul HakimLead Guitar
Asrat Aemro SellasiePercussion
Mulugetta GessesseRhythm Guitar

Executive-Producer – Rita Marley






A1Dallol - Selam (4:48)
A2Dallol - Genesis (4:16)
A3Dallol - Love Is Coming (4:16)
A4Dallol - Reggae In The Moonlight (4:40)

B1Dallol - Hoye Hoya (3:20)
B2Dallol - Sail Along (5:07)
B3Dallol - Nice Feelings (3:50)
B4Dallol - Ashkaroo (traditional song) (3:40)
B5Dallol - Mr. DJ (4:50)




Thursday, November 24, 2016

Elias Assefa - Kelay [2015] [ethiopia]














Elias Assefa - Kelay





Elias Assefa - 01 - Séwunet (Being Human) (4:13)
Elias Assefa - 02 - Kélay (From Above) (5:50)
Elias Assefa - 03 - Yé Egzer Siel (God’s Painting) (6:56)
Elias Assefa - 04 - Zenaw (The News) (3:52)
Elias Assefa - 05 - Léka (It is Rather That) (5:14)
Elias Assefa - 06 - To ቶ (Symbol of Life) (4:00)
Elias Assefa - 07 - Gize (Time) (4:26)
Elias Assefa - 08 - Yenéfse Erkata (My Soul’s Satisfaction) (5:07)
Elias Assefa - 09 - Léwuletash (Tribute to You) (4:28)
Elias Assefa - 10 - Ebid New Sime (They Call me a Mad Man) (5:04)
Elias Assefa - 11 - Betsélot (With Prayer) (5:42)
Elias Assefa - 12 - Tibeb Ze Solomon (Solomon’s Wisdom) (5:32)
Elias Assefa - 13 - Sus (Addiction) (5:39)
Elias Assefa - 14 - Aman be (In Peace) (4:48)




Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Abdi Nuressa - [2009] - Irree Aadaa [usa+ethiopia]










             Another rising star is the Washington-based Oromo singer Abdi Nuressa. The 34-year-old singer-songwriter is a breath of fresh air, combining love, politics and empowerment. 

          Born in the Western part of Oromia region and brought up in Addis Ababa, Abdi emigrated to the US as a teenager. He was naturally influenced by the different cultures to which he was exposed but has remained true to his roots, as clearly seen in his music. He kicked off his singing career by performing cover versions of old Oromo classics such as those of Ali Birra. His debut album, Iree Adda, was released at the end of July 2009, marking his arrival on the music scene. The album, bearing an English subtitle The Power of Culture, can be seen as a political statement and an expression of the longing to return to his roots. The strong and energetic rhythms, taken from the Oromo tradition, are mingled in a subtle way with the sounds of reggae, funk, folk and hip-hop. 





Abdi Nuressa - Ayyaana Laalattuu



      One song in particular on that album, 'Ayyaana Laalattu' (Afan Oromo for 'opportunist'), put Abdi Nuressa on the map. Crossing the language barrier, the song was a big hit both in Ethiopia and abroad, among people who speak the language and those who don't. It proved the star's argument that "if we Oromo artists can deliver quality music, the language can never be a barrier, especially in our time."




Abdi Nuressa - 01 - Nutuu Laafe (4:50)
Abdi Nuressa - 02 - Ee Sobaan Wallolle (5:26)
Abdi Nuressa - 03 - Qotee Bulaa (4:32)
Abdi Nuressa - 04 - Utuman Sijaaladhuu (4:05)
Abdi Nuressa - 05 - Tokkummaatu Wayyaa (6:24)
Abdi Nuressa - 06 - Yaa Raahaa (6:05)
Abdi Nuressa - 07 - Sinbirree Ta'ee (3:58)
Abdi Nuressa - 08 - Wal-argaan Hinoolu (5:01)
Abdi Nuressa - 09 - Shaggoyee Xabanna (4:39)
Abdi Nuressa - 10 - Guyyaa Gammachuu (6:14)
Abdi Nuressa - 11 - Argee Laalee Laalee (5:58)
Abdi Nuressa - 12 - Ayyaana Laalattuu (4:48)
Abdi Nuressa - 13 - Bareeduu Baadiyaa (4:52)



Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Zvuloon Dub System - Anbessa Dub [2014] [isr+eth]









       Zvuloon Dub System is Israel's leading Reggae band. Adopting their name from one of the twelve tribes of Israel, the band was formed in 2006 by the Smilan brothers. They shared the same passion for roots reggae and dub, with influences from a variety of music styles, like Ethiopian jazz and rare grooves from the 70’s, USA's soul, funk and jazz, alongside with Israeli mizrahi (oriental) music.





   Zvuloon Dub System - Anbessa Dub [FULL ALBUM]   



band members:

Gili Yalo - lead vocals, 
Inon Peretz - trumpet, 
Ilan Adiri - tenor sax, 
Ilan Smilan - lead guitar, 
Simon Nahum - rhythm guitar, 
Lior Romano - piano and organ, 
Tal Marcus - bass, 
Asaf Smilan - drums and percussion 


guests artists:

Mahmoud Ahmed - vocals (5), 
Zemene Melesse - vocals (8), 
Yaacov Lilay - vocals (7), krar (1,7,10), 
Dejen Manchelot – masinko (10), 
Roei Hermon - trumpet (6, 9), 
Yonatan Voltzok - trombone ?(1-5, 7) 
Maayan Milo – trombone (6,8,9), 
Omri Abramov - alto Sax (1-3, 5-7,9),
Elad Gellert -? baritone sax (1), 
Shay Sattaman Jacovi - backing vocals (8) 








Monday, July 18, 2016

Ermias - Mystic Groove [1998] [usa + ethiopia]










          Originally from Ethiopia, Ermias T. Kebede lived in different parts of the world including France and Italy. He currenly resides in the US, in the city of Chicago, IL. 

        Picked up the guitar in SJS High School in Addis Ababa and has been playing every kind of music since. He joined a variety of bands in his career, some of whose members have played with the likes of Dizzy Gillespie and Ziggy Marley. 

        Currently a member of ABOGIDA band touring with Teddy Afro, he also runs his own independent label, ETK MUSIC, under which he has released two albums "Mystic Groove" and "Glimpse of Victory"

      A combination of world, jazz and Reggae music like never mixed before, "Mystic Groove" transports you into the planes of strong rhythms and hypnotic grooves with subtle yet distinct melodies paving the way. 

       "My primary motivation for completing the project "Mystic Groove" is to bring forth the mystical rhythms of Reggae to a wider audience. I have always been moved by the subtle yet powerful rhythm of the "one drop" beat that mainly categorizes Reggae music from the rest. I believe different types of music affect different parts of the human self and Reggae goes right to the spirit"




Ermias - 01. Mystic Groove (3:56)
Ermias - 02. Colors Of Home (3:49)
Ermias - 03. Journey (3:51)
Ermias - 04. Above The Ocean (4:43)
Ermias - 05. Abeba (3:48)
Ermias - 06. In The Space (4:42)
Ermias - 07. Celebration (3:09)
Ermias - 08. Galloping Through (4:25)
Ermias - 09. Caribbean Morning (3:49)
Ermias - 10. Melancholic Trance (4:48)



Saturday, June 11, 2016

Chachi Tadesse - Hoya Hoye [1999] [ethiopia]









          Most Rastafarians consider Ethiopia to be their spiritual homeland and identify with that country to some extent-some even incorporate Amharic phrases into their songs, the classic example being the Abyssinians' repatriation classic "Satta Massa Gana." 





Chachi Tadesse - Enkuan Des Yalachu




        Chachi Tadesse does this tradition one step better-she actually is Ethiopian, and sings primarily in Amharic. 

       And while reggae is the foundation of her art, there's more to it than that; "Musica," with its swaggering beat and turntable work, shows a marked hip-hop influence, while her singing on the dancehall-flavored "Unity" seems to draw at least as much on North African vocal traditions as on the Memphis-by-way-of-Kingston sound that characterizes most reggae singing. Her muttered toasting on "Gorraw" is quietly compelling. She gets help from guests both famous (Stephen Marley, Sizzla) and obscure (Lisa Danger, Billy Mystic), but her shimmering voice is always at the core of each song's sound. This is a remarkable album.




Chachi Tadesse - 01 - Musica (ft. Stephen Marley) (4:45)
Chachi Tadesse - 02 - Hoya Hoye (with Garnett Silk's children) (4:13)
Chachi Tadesse - 03 - Rambosa (ft. Sizzla) (4:15)
Chachi Tadesse - 04 - Fiker Band Menged (One Way Street) (5:09)
Chachi Tadesse - 05 - Hibret (Unity) (ft. Gaddiel & Daweh Congo) (4:17)
Chachi Tadesse - 06 - Ye Africa Negest (African Queen) (ft. Prezident Brown) (4:20)
Chachi Tadesse - 07 - Gorraw (ft. Doniki & Lisa Danger) (4:18)
Chachi Tadesse - 08 - Atresa (Warning) (ft. Billy Mystic, Iqulah Rastafari, Doniki & Steady Ranks) (4:57)
Chachi Tadesse - 09 - Natty Dread (ft. Sister Carol) (3:55)
Chachi Tadesse - 10 - Mesgana (Give Thanks) (ft. Kulcha Knox) (5:43)




Saturday, April 30, 2016

Invisible System - Street Clan [2011] [eng]




   R  E  U  P  L  O  A  D   




Invisible System - Street Clan




       Invisible System return with another highly original eclectic fusion album. Following their internationally acclaimed and Songlines World Music Awards Best Newcomer Nominated CD Punt (Made in Ethiopia), Street Clan is named after some graffiti Dan Harper found in Mali, West Africa. It is again not a pure world music album. It covers genres such as rock, dance, drum and bass, dub, reggae, Ethiopian, post-punk, kraut rock, pop, psychedelia and even this time r'n'b and dubstep.

      17 tracks take you through a real journey of shockingly original pulsating sounds that tie to Punt but sound more accomplished and distinctive in style. The album was again recorded between Ethiopia, Mali and the UK whilst Dan Harper was aid working, with the mixing finished in country. Many known guests again feature on this album including Portishead's Adrian Utley and Skip McDonald (African Head Charge, The Sugar Hill Gang, Tackhead and Little Axe.








          It’s impossible not to admire Dan Harper. Until five years ago, he was an aid worker in Ethiopia, where he not only became fascinated by the country’s remarkable music scene but built his own studio in Addis Ababa and managed to persuade leading local artists to record with him. He also invited producer and bassist Nick Page, also known as Count Dubulah, out to Ethiopia and introduced him to his musical friends; as a result, Page formed his highly successful Ethiopian fusion band Dub Colossus.

     Once he returned to England, where he now works as an unconventional music teacher in the West Country, Harper continued work on a fusion project of his own. He persuaded an impressive selection of British musicians to add their contributions to his Ethiopian recordings, and the result was the album Punt, credited to a band Harper called Invisible System. It included a remarkable cast, from the legendary Ethiopian singer Mahmoud Ahmed through to punk hero Captain Sensible, guitarist Justin Adams and Count Dubulah; the results veered from African styles to psychedelic rock, trip-hop and dub. Although this was originally something of an obscure DIY release, Harper managed to bring his work to national attention, and won impressive reviews.

        Since then, the two Ethiopian fusion experiments have continued. Dub Colossus, now a rousing live band rather than merely a studio project, have a new album of Ethio-jazz and reggae fusions, Addis Through the Looking Glass, while Invisible System have a very different second set, Street Clan.

         Once again, the album is based around recordings that Harper made in Africa – this time in Mali as well as Ethiopia – to which he adds his own guitar, bass, synth programming, percussion and production work. Then there are contributions from a new set of Western musicians, including the great American guitarist Skip McDonald, Adrian Utley (Portishead), Stuart Fisher (who has worked with Courtney Love), and members of psychedelic hippie heroes Ozric Tentacles. Then there’s Jamaican singer Dennis Wint, who Harper met in the Somerset town of Frome, where he lives and works.

        Street Clan is even more wild, frantic and unexpected than Punt, with sections that work brilliantly and tracks where Ethiopian vocals are surrounded by a blitz of thrash guitar and percussion, results ranging from exhilarating to messy. The best tracks come towards the end, where the emphasis shifts from the clash of African vocals with full-tilt Western guitars, through to more conventional dub reggae. There’s still an African edge to Teenage Lion and Broken Heart, thanks to the vocal work from Zewditu Tadesse; but Wint dominates the songs with an energy and style that makes him sound like an unlikely male answer to early Patti Smith.

      There's a huge sea change between Invisible System's debut and this sophomore outing. Where the first was definitely based around Ethiopian music, this is a much more amorphous and adventurous beast. If it needs to be defined, it's a rock -- maybe even post-rock -- album. Ethiopia is still there, and some of the music was recorded in Addis Ababa. But many of the sounds were made in England using a truly staggering range of musicians, and there's a powerful Jamaican influence at work here, too. If you need an analogy, think of the work of Adrian Sherwood, or even some PiL (in fact, "Mutant Miners" sounds like it could be have been smuggled off some fantastical PiL album). This is world music in the sense that it was made by people from different parts of the globe coming together, but its roots are in the here and now rather than in any tradition. It's challenging, adventurous, and heavily textured; the tracks were recorded live and later chopped up and mixed, although you'd never notice the joints. It might prove to be one of the finds of 2011, a real sonic adventure that speaks highly of Dan Harper, the man behind it all.

review by Chris Nickson





01 Tizita (feat. Portishead Adrian Utley, Ethiopiques)                                                       4:01  
02 Ambassel (feat. Mimi + band (after signed as Dub Colossus also))                          5:25
03 Zedanmer (feat. Eat Static, Ethiopiques)                                                       4:38
04 Bone Flaps (feat. Merv Pepler and Los Mutartis + Ethiopiques)                                3:51
05 Backyard (feat. Skip McDonald (On U Sound, LIttle Axe, Sugar Hill Gang), Dennis… 4:47
06 Skunk Funk (feat. The Ullulators)                                                                                     4:30
07 Opidervtu (feat. Eat Static, Ethiopiques)                                                                       4:26
08 Womens Love (feat. Ozric Tentacles, Rythmites, Ethiopiques, Sydney Salmon)   6:15
09 Mutant Miners (feat. Merv Pepler, Los Mutartis, Ethiopiques)               6:08
10 Live Up To Love (feat. Hilaire Chabby (Baba Maal), Dennis Wint, Ethiopiques)     3:15
11 Men Dont Cry (feat. Eat Static, Dennis Wint, Ethiopqiues)                                       2:46
12 Oumabetty (feat. Jonny / Akrilu (Mamoud Ahmed))                                                   3:13
13 Teenage Lion (feat. Ryhthmites Flash, Ethiopques,)                                               6:08
14 Broken Heart (feat. Dennis Wint, Leyikun Ethiopia)                                               3:33
15 Katabo (feat. Merv Pepler, Dennis Wint)                                                               3:45
16 Naturalisation (feat. Dennis Wint, Joie Hinton)                                                       7:57
17 Rapture (feat. Merv Pepler, Dennis Wint)                                                               3:20