Blogtrotters

Showing posts with label world fusion. Show all posts
Showing posts with label world fusion. Show all posts

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Debo Band - Montana folk festival no.02 - 2013-07-12 [2013] excerpts [usa+eth]











       Debo Band are a large ensemble led by Ethiopian-American saxophonist Danny Mekonnen and fronted by charismatic vocalist Bruck Tesfaye. Since their inception in 2006, the band has won raves for their groundbreaking take on Ethiopian pop music (think Ethiopiques), which incorporates traditional scales and vocal styles, alongside American soul and funk rhythms, and instrumentation reminiscent of Eastern European brass bands.



Debo Band features:

Bruck Tesfaye vocals
Danny Mekonnen saxophones
Gabriel Birnbaum tenor saxophone
Danilo Henriquez trumpet and percussion
Stephanie Baird trombone
Jonah Rapino electric violin
Kaethe Hostetter five-stringed violin
Marié Abe accordion
Brendon Wood guitar
Arik Grier sousaphone
PJ Goodwin bass
Adam Clark drums








Debo Band - Lantchi Biye 
(2013 Montana Folk Festival)






Debo Band - 01 - Musicawi Silt (6:34)
Debo Band - 02 - Yene Neger (7:03)
Debo Band - 03 - Not Just A Song (7:04)
Debo Band - 04 - Jeguol Naw Betwa (5:12)
Debo Band - 05 - Ney Ney Weleba (7:57)











Saturday, April 15, 2017

Tommy T - The Prester John Sessions [2009] [usa+eth]






   R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   






       For the past three years, Tommy T (Thomas T Gobena) has been the bass player for gypsy punk powerhouse Gogol Bordello, the New York City-based band known for their blend of Gypsy, punk, dub reggae, metal and flamenco. 









       Tommy was born and raised in Ethiopia and the knowledge of global rhythms he brings to Gogol’s sound has become part of their unclassifiable approach to music making. With the encouragement of his Gogol Bordello band mates, Tommy has produced his first solo effort, The Prester John Sessions, an aural travelogue that rages freely through the music and culture of Ethiopia.

      "In the 70s, funk, wah-wah pedals, and jazz had a huge impact on Ethiopian music," Tommy explains. "The Prester John Sessions will give people an idea about the musical diversity of Ethiopia, which includes influences and ideas borrowed from the sounds of the 70's with the added bonus of up-to-date production values."









       Tommy discovered the story of Prester John in Graham Hancock’s book The Sign and the Seal. “Hancock was looking for the Biblical Ark of the Covenant,” Tommy says. “His quest led him around the world, from Middle East to Europe and back to Ethiopia. While doing his research, Hancock discovered the legend of Prester John. In the 12th and 13th centuries, Prester John was an unknown Christian king with massive troops that got the attention of European kings. Prester John is the character I use to symbolize the man who will bring Ethiopian culture to the rest of the world.”

       To fulfill his vision, Tommy started digging through Ethiopian folk music, choosing melodies he could improvise on. He also wrote his own compositions based on traditional modes. “A lot of popular Ethiopian music is based on a 6/8 beat called chikchika, but there are also many other rhythms in Ethiopia that have their own unique characteristics. I play with The Abyssinian Roots Collective on the album. They are sometimes known as The ARC, which coincidentally ties into the Ark of the Covenant and the Prester John story. We’re mostly Ethiopian, so getting the music down was easy. I gave them the tunes, and then we improvised the arrangements so the music has an organic feel.”











       Tommy composed and produced the music, with his brother Henock contributing to the tunes “Brothers” and “East-West Express.” The tracks were written at Tommy’s home studio and cut live in a couple of studios around Washington, DC and overdubs were laid down in real time with a final mix by Victor Van Vugt (Nick Cave, Gogol Bordello) that gave it the feel of Herbie Hancock’s Headhunters jamming with Ethiopian godfathers The Imperial Bodyguard Orchestra. The music blends Ethiopian modes with dub reggae, funk, and jazz, for a sound that’s at once familiar and mysterious.

      “The Eighth Wonder” has a light, jazzy feel based on the chikchika rhythm, played in the style common to the Wollo province, home to the rock-hewn churches of Lalibela. “Much like the pyramids of Giza, much has been made over the 11 stone churches of Lalibela, often referred to as the “Eighth Wonder,” Tommy explains. “This track uses the chikchika beat, but expands it into other directions.” Tommy’s melodic bass weaves through the tune’s horn and Massinqo (an Ethiopian single-stringed instrument played like a violin) lines, while the drummer keeps the beat with a series of tom rolls complimenting the kick drum. Dub effects keep the instruments dancing in and out of the mix. “Beyond Fasiladas” references the Castle of the emperor Fasiladas in Gondar, Ethiopia’s capital in the 17th Century. It uses a fast, driving beat from Gondar and interpolates several traditional melodies. Massinqo, guitar and an energetic bass line give the tune a funky, relentless pulse. Setegne Setenaw plays the melody on Massinqo. “The Response” features vocals from Gigi and Tommy. It’s a love song with an almost unbearable sense of longing. Tommy plays acoustic guitar and bouzouki with a West African feel influenced by the music of Mali, although the melody is purely Ethiopian. “Eden” pays homage to the lush and raw landscapes of Ethiopia. Gigi’s wordless vocal is full of joy. The slow dubby rhythm and a muted blue flugelhorn give the track a timeless feel. “Oromo Dub (Cushitic dub)” is driven by Tommy’s phat bass riddim and revolves around traditional tunes that existed ages ago. Abdi Nuressa sings in Oromo, one of the many languages in Ethiopia, and his voice drifts through intergalactic dub space taking this ancient song into the future. The album’s ten tracks epitomize the Ethiopian ideal of Semena Worq - Wax and Gold. The wax is the surface of the music, bright and modern, with its jazzy, funky accents. The gold signifies the depth of tradition that gave birth to these sounds, nuggets culled from one of the oldest cultures on earth, presented by Tommy and his compatriots in all their shining beauty.

       Tommy T was born and raised in Ethiopia’s capital city, Addis Ababa. “There was always music in our house,” Tommy recalls. “When I was five, my older brother Zelalem got an acoustic guitar from my father. By the time I was six I could pick up a guitar and play what my brothers were playing.

       Tommy had no intention of becoming a musician, but when his brother Henock moved to Washington DC, Tommy followed. “I looked up to him as a brother and a bass player. After he sent a copy of his first album to us in Ethiopia, I started playing acoustic guitar like a bass. When I came to the States, I got a real bass. There are over 200,000 Ethiopians in the DC metro area, so I was able to make a living playing in Ethiopian bands.”

       Tommy completed a degree while playing in bands three or four nights a week. “I played in Ethiopian bands, and then started a reggae band called ADOLA which also backed many well known Ethiopian artists such as Aster Aweke and Gigi to name a few. I was also interested in other styles of music including R&B, hip-hop, and neo-soul. I worked with Wayna [Wondwossen, recently nominated for a best urban performance Grammy for her song “Lovin’ U (Music)”] and produced a couple of tracks on her Moments of Clarity album with my friend Abegasu Shiota.” While collaborating on a project with guitarist Eran Tabib, he heard Gogol Bordello was looking for a bass player familiar with international grooves.

    His years with Gogol inspired Tommy to develop The Prester John Sessions, another band with a global outlook. The reggae band he and his friend Zedicus (Zakki Jawad) started in DC had evolved into The Abyssinian Roots Collective; they helped Tommy bring The Prester John Sessions to life. “I believe in music without boundaries,” Tommy says. “Music should be inclusive, not exclusive. We should use sounds from everywhere to create a universal vibe. The music business isn’t friendly to that kind of thing, but the people who hear it respond to it well. Gogol is a rock band, but the sound is global. People who love music know the best music is created without boundaries and limitations. The Prester John Sessions take that idea to the next level.”




01. Tommy T - Brothers (5:03)
02. Tommy T - The Call (4:04)
03. Tommy T - The Response (Featuring Gigi) (4:43)
04. Tommy T - The Eighth Wonder (6:51)
05. Tommy T - Oromo Dub (Cushitic Dub) (4:34)
06. Tommy T - East-West Express (4:21)
07. Tommy T - Tribute To A King (4:11)
08. Tommy T - Beyond Fasiladas (3:16)
09. Tommy T - September Blues (3:29)
10. Tommy T - Eden (Featuring Gigi) (5:53)
11. Tommy T - Lifers (Michael G Easy Star Remix feat. 
                          Eugene Hutz And Pedro Erazo) (2:06)



Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Le-alem Band - Le-alem Band [fin+eth]















       Le-alem Acoustic is, as the name suggests, an acoustic band from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia formed in 2014 G.C. It consists of friends with varied musical backgrounds. This band is reviving the powerful and melodic sound of classic Ethiopian music with a fusion of diverse foreign influences such as alternative, jazz and reggae.

     The varied musical tastes of the members gives the band a unique sound that is hard to classify into one genre. Their playlist mostly consists of songs from the “Swinging Addis” Era of Ethiopia from the 60’s to 70’s rearranged and modified to their own unique sound.

      Our sound is a combination of Scandinavian and Ethiopian tradition and carried out by showy instruments such as double bass, jouhikko, violins, acoustic guitar, kantele, masinko, bongo drums and Cajon box.








Le-alem Band - Ambassel Jam




Le-alem Band - 01 - Metch Dershae by Seifu Yohannes (4:18)
Le-alem Band02 - Fikir Ende Kirar Ethio Groove acoustic cover by Le alem acoustic (2:34)
Le-alem Band - 03 - Fikir Ende Kirar by Girma Beyene (3:27)
Le-alem Band - 03 - Woub Nat by Girma Beyene and Menilik Wessnachew (3:49)
Le-alem Band - 05 - Anchi Yene by Sami Dan (4:05)
Le-alem Band - 06 - Tsigereda by Seifu Yohannes (3:06)
Le-alem Band - 07 - Yekereme Fikir by Getachew Kassa (3:51)
Le-alem Band - 08 - Kalatashiw Akal by Teshome Assegid (3:52)
Le-alem Band - 09 - Vem Kan Segla and Ambassel Jam (5:57)











Mikimac (Jurry): lead vocals and percussion
Kidus Tamiru: acoustic guitar
Tariku Arega: violin, masinko
Henrica Fagerlund: double bass
Veronica Solje: backing vocals, violin, kantele
Filippa Salo: backing vocals, jouhikko





Monday, April 10, 2017

Addis Black Mamba - Addis Black Mamba [fra+eth]












        For the next two years sextet Addis Black Mamba has been (re) experiencing ethio-jazz by exploring a melancholic, energetic and singular sound universe tinged with afrobeat, blues, funk, psyche rock and free -jazz. 

        With a repertoire mixing ethical classics from the 60s to 70s with current nuggets of unknown groups, as well as his ethno-groove cinematic compositions, Addis Black Mamba knows, like a snake charmer, bewitching his audience. His arrangements with haunting rhythms and hypnotic melodies lead undoubtedly all the lovers of groove for a unique sonic journey from one coast to the other of Africa. 

          Warning: the bite is incurable ...










Nico Barnier - Tenor and baritone sax
Tom Blon - Bass
Cyril Decubber - Percussions
David Mimey - Tenor and alto sax
Agnès Rakovec - Flute
Benoît Roudel - Guitar
Olivier Trénel - Trumpet
Romain Viader - Drums










Addis Black Mamba - 2 - Guragigna (3:59)
Addis Black Mamba - 3 - Yekatit (4:22)
Addis Black Mamba - 4 - Marz (5:17)
Addis Black Mamba - 5 - Miyazia (4:20)
Addis Black Mamba - 6 - Ethiopino (5:24)
Addis Black Mamba - 7 - Followed Path (4:20)
Addis Black Mamba - 8 - Lale Lale (4:17)
Addis Black Mamba - 9 - Le Petit (4:41)





Thursday, March 16, 2017

Gigi & Bill Laswell's Material - New Flowers From Addis [live @ Krems 2009] [ethiopia]







   R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   












four tracks from their gig at Krems, 2009. 











Gigi and Alemayehu Fanta - Zerafewa

                                                        




Monday, March 6, 2017

Dub Colossus - Addis Through The Looking Glass [2011] [ethiopia]





   R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   










       Dub Colossus is a collective of Ethiopian musicians working with Western musicians fascinated by the richness of the Ethiopian sound. 










      
      A Town Called Addis ...was their striking debut in 2008 but this is better, probably thanks to their live concerts. 

       There's a strong reggae influence, but it's songs like the punchy Guragigna that stand out, with great vocals by "the Ethiopian Edith Piaf", Sintayehu Zenebe, underpinned by a piano ostinato and a muscular horn section with great sax solos.












Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Dub Colossus - Dub Will Tear Us Apart [2010] [ethiopia]



   R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   














    In 2006 Nick 'Dubulah' Page, British producer, multi-instrumentalist and founding member of Transglobal Underground and Syriana, first travelled to Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa. His aim was to collaborate with musicians and explore traditional Azmari styles, 60s Ethiopian pop, Ethiojazz and 70s Jamaican Dub Reggae. He came across some amazingly talented artists – female vocalists Tsedenia Gebremarkos and Sintayehu 'Mimi' Zenebe, Ethiojazz pianist Samuel Yirga, tenor sax player Feleke Hailu and Teremage Woretaw on messenqo (one-string fiddle) and vocals. 










       Dub Colossus was born. The first recordings were exclusively previewed on Society of Sound. Then followed the critically acclaimed debut album 'A Town Called Addis,' (2008) and a series of outstanding live shows.











        Especially for Society of Sound, the band have put together ‘Dub Will Tear Us Apart’, featuring ten brand new tracks fresh from studio sessions in Real World, Edinburgh and Addis Ababa. Highlights include Dub Colossus’ Anglo-Ethiopian version of the reggae classic, “Uptown Top Ranking”, written and originally performed by Jamaican girl duo Althea & Donna, which topped the UK singles chart in 1978. "It had a big effect on me," explains Nick Page, "seeing it on Top Of The Pops… it was a first in many ways." 

       The connection between Ethiopia and Jamaica has been well documented, especially with regards to the lyrical content of a lot of Jamaican Roots Reggae music. Dub Colossus’ dread Abesha version is fronted by Sintayehu and Tsedenia, with UK/Jamaican guest MC JP Higgins. 




      



     Other highlights include "Guragignia", a ferociously funky Ethiopian song which sounds like a blue taxi going at full speed with no brakes during rush hour in Addis Ababa. A live show favourite, it features lead vocals by Sintayehu. "Selemi" is another live favourite, an Ethio-Funk stomper fronted by Tsedenia supported by the keyboards of Samuel Yirga and saxes of Feleke Hailu, that morphs into a southern Ethiopian rhythm of release. In contrast, "Medina" is a Teremage Woretaw traditional solo track, for voice and messenqo. A gospel song performed to mark a period of fasting, Teremage sings in growling wild swoops as he bows his messenqo with an intense energy. 









        Dub Will Tear Us Apart features members of the current live band for the first time: drummer Nick Van Gelder (ex Jamiroquai, Brand New Heavies), bass player Dr Das (ex Asian Dub Foundation), vocalist PJ Higgins (Natacha Atlas, Almamegretta, Kenneth Bager), as well as the wonderful Horns of Negus, who recently worked with Dr John, Dizzee Rascal, The Streets, consisting of Ben Somers (tenor and baritone sax), Robert Dowell (trombone) and Jonathan Radford (trumpet).






01. Dub Colossus - Dub Will Tear Us Apart (6:41)
02. Dub Colossus - Wey Fikir (4:21)
03. Dub Colossus - Yeh Shimbraw Tir Tir (4:21)
04. Dub Colossus - Dub Me Tender (4:23)
05. Dub Colossus - Satta Massagans (inst version) (3:43)
06. Dub Colossus - Kuratu (5:09)
07. Dub Colossus - Uptown Top Ranking (5:03)
08. Dub Colossus - Guragigna (5:13)
09. Dub Colossus - Medina (3:07)
10. Dub Colossus - Selemi (6:42)




Monday, July 25, 2016

Temesgen - Ethio-banjo [2007] [ethiopia]




   R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   







       Temesgen was born and raised in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He has studied with Alemayehu Fanta and Teshome Shenkute at the Yared School of Music in Addis Ababa. It is Temesgen's dream to keep alive the ancient musical traditions of Ethiopia. He is in the process of setting up a school to teach the Begena and the Krar.






     

        "Listen to the stark, haunting sounds of traditional Ethiopian music and you will be elevated to a place free from worries and strife. The wisdom and knowledge of centuries of culture are communicated by the nimble fingers and resonant voice of Temesgen. Temesgen sings songs of life, of love and of devotion. Deeply spiritual, with the simple truth of folk music, sanded and distilled by generations of musicians, these songs have evolved over the ages to shine with the pristine beauty of the very roots " 

- liner notes from Begena Bedtimes (2006).



 A versatile singer-songwriter, Temesgen has begun to explore the frontiers of ethio-fusion. His non-traditional work is a soulful stew of reggae, ethiopian, and jazz. He is currently working on Begena Fusion, an album that features the begena in a modern milieu. And, Krarization a collection of popular contemporary songs re-interpreted with the help of the krar. Temesgen has also created instructional DVDs on how to play the krar and the begena.










Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Anbessa Orchestra - [2015] - Anbessa Orchestra [EP] [usa+eth]











       Anbessa Orchestra is a 7 piece group from NYC that draws it's inspiration from the beautiful music of Ethiopia. Playing arrangements of Ethiopian funk tunes from the 60's-70's as well as original music with Ethiopian influences.



Wayne Tucker - Trumpet
Eyal Vilner - Alto Sax
Eden Bareket - Baritone Sax
Nadav Peled - Guitar
Dor Heled - Keyboards
Tamir Shmerling - Bass
Eran Fink - Drums











Anbessa Orchestra - 01 - Aynotche Terabu (4:40)
Anbessa Orchestra - 02 - Yematibela Wef (5:20)
Anbessa Orchestra - 03 - Lions  (4:51)
Anbessa Orchestra - 04 - Nagatti Si Jedha (4:19)
Anbessa Orchestra - 05 - Le'b (6:08)
Anbessa Orchestra - 06 - Zelel Zelel (3:20)
Anbessa Orchestra - 07 - Antchi Qondjo (3:17)
Anbessa Orchestra - 08 - Gurage (8:34)


Thursday, May 26, 2016

Temesgen - Begena Fusion [2012] [ethiopia]










              Temesgen was born and raised in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He has studied with Alemayehu Fanta and Teshome Shenkute at the Yared School of Music in Addis Ababa. It is Temesgen's dream to keep alive the ancient musical traditions of Ethiopia. He is in the process of setting up a school to teach the Begena and the Krar.






Temesgen - Yibellahalla [Begena Fusion]




           A versatile singer-songwriter, Temesgen has begun to explore the frontiers of ethio-fusion. His non-traditional work is a soulful stew of reggae, ethiopian, and jazz. He is currently working on Begena Fusion, an album that features the begena in a modern milieu. And, Krarization a collection of popular contemporary songs re-interpreted with the help of the krar. Temesgen has also created instructional DVDs on how to play the krar and the begena.




Temesgen - 01 - Yibelahalla (3:11)
Temesgen - 02 - Dawit Bebegena (3:27)
Temesgen - 03 - Qiddus (3:48)
Temesgen - 04 - Meserete Zema (3:26)
Temesgen - 05 - Dirdera (5:27)
Temesgen - 06 - Maan Yimeramer (3:35)
Temesgen - 07 - Nu Nu (3:03)
Temesgen - 08 - Alayenim Belu (5:32)
Temesgen - 09 - Haadeego (2:26)
Temesgen - 10 - Abba Gragn (4:09)