Blogtrotters

Showing posts with label compilation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label compilation. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

v.a. - [2018] - Ethiopian Popular and Folk Music (Bezunesh, Tlahoun, Bahta Gebrehiwot, Menelik Wessanechew) [ethiopia]





This post is completely taken from extraordinary new blog dedicated to an older african music. 

My true admiration goes to Matthew Lavoie, the author. 

You may find his blog here >>> WALLAHI LE ZEIN! 








Menelik Wossenachew




Here is another reel of radio recordings from the horn of Africa.  This reel was compiled by Ato Girma Zande, the music librarian of Radio Ethiopia back in the late 1960s (my guess is 1966-67).  As you have surely read in the Ethiopiques liner notes (essential reading on Ethiopian music), the 1960s were a decade of musical ferment in Ethiopia.  A decade of musical innovation and flux, foreshadowing the prolific early 1970s, the 'Golden Era' of Ethiopian popular music that has become a musical benchmark--akin to 1930s Harlem or 1980s Kingston--known to music lovers throughout the world. 


This reel features five tracks by Bezunesh Bekele, including a 'traditional' version of 'Ere Mela Mela' as well as a live recording, three short and wonderful tracks by Bahta Gebrehiwot, three by Tilahoun Gessesse, the greatest Ethiopian singer of the Golden Age, and four lovely cuts by Menelik Wessenachew.  These singers are accompanied by the great orchestras of the decade, the Ras Band, the Imperial Bodyguard Orchestra and the Haile Selassie Orchestra.  The reel starts with four tracks of 'traditional' music, featuring, in particular, two lovely songs from Tigre and Shoa province.






Bezunesh Bekele - Hizb le Hizb





I recorded these tracks straight from the master reel to CD.  This is an old reel and some of the tracks are a little wobbly.  I have left the tracks in the order that Ato Zande dubbed them and I have not fiddled with the sound, no noise reduction, filtering, or eq.

Ethiopian Popular and Folk Music (Tracks prepared by Ato Girma Zande, Music Librarian, Radio Ethiopia) 

I don't think any of these tracks are on the many reissues of classic Ethiopian music that have been released in the last twenty years.  Don't hesitate to point out releases that I may have missed or to share what you know about these recordings. 
  

The first picture is taken from a Menelik Wessanachew record sleeve and the second from a Bahta Gibrehewot sleeve.   Enjoy.





Askale Berhane - 01 - Gojja Minja (2:19)
Bezunesh Bekele - 02 - Era Mela Mela (3:38)
Uncredited - 03 - Mandjar (from Shoa Province) (3:21)
Uncredited - 04 - Temesgen (from Tigre) (5:45)

Bahta Gibre-Hewot with Ras Band - 05 - Anchem Indela (3:33)
Bahta Gibre-Hewot with Ras Band - 06 - Tar New (1:17)
Bahta Gibre-Hewot with Ras Band - 07 - Ine Nenj Woy Monj (2:50)
Bahta Gibre-Hewot with Ras Band - 08 - Ene Metch Alkuna (2:22)

Bezunesh Bekele & Imperial Body Guard Orchestra - 09 - Ere Keyete Meta (2:58)
Bezunesh Bekele & Imperial Body Guard Orchestra - 10 - Ante Temeta Ene (live) (2:28)
Bezunesh Bekele & Imperial Body Guard Orchestra - 11 - Yaleb Lay Esat (5:59)
Bezunesh Bekele & Imperial Body Guard Orchestra - 12 - Kante Gara Lehun (2:25)

Telahun Gessesse - 13 - Satwadenj Wodeyet (4:18)
Telahun Gessesse - 14 - Ere Min Yeshalengal (2:22)
Telahun Gessesse - 15 - Feker Lebichaye (4:10)

Menelik Wossenachew & Haile Selassie Orchestra - 16 - Yayne Alem (3:41)
Menelik Wossenachew & Haile Selassie Orchestra - 17 - Tez Teyengalesh (3:55)
Menelik Wossenachew & Haile Selassie Orchestra - 18 - Almaz Eyasebbhush (4:40)
Menelik Wossenachew & Haile Selassie Orchestra - 19 - Yehagre Tezeta (2:23)




Tuesday, January 16, 2018

v.a. - Ethiopian Urban Modern Music Vol.3 [More Ethiopian Soul & Groove] [2009]





   R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   














   The amazing Ethiopoques series continues to amaze with another stunning album of classic "Golden Era" Ethiopian recordings from 60's & 70's Addis Ababa. The third in their 'Ethiopian Modern Music' volumes, this album collects a massively varied set of killer grooves; from the super tight soul funk of Girma Béyéné's 'Ené négn bay manésh' or his kinkier psyche funk winner 'Yebeeqagnal', to Seyoum Gébreyés and Wallias Band's rhodes driven 'Métch enéterf féléghu' or the extended slow jam 'Djémérégne' from Muluqén Mélléssé and the intoxicating female vocals of 'Métché néw' from Asséléfétch Ashiné and Géténésh Kebrét.









1. Girma Beyene - Ene negn bay manesh (4:02)
2. Seyoum Gebreyes and Wallias band - Metch ene terf feleghu (2:21)
3. Hirut Beqele - Ewnetegna feqer (3:15)
4. Samuel Belay - Qeresh endewaza (3:17)
5. Girma Beyene - Yebeqagnal (3:30)
6. Girma Beyene - Ene negn bay manesh (3:27)
7. Muluqen Mellesse - Djemeregne (7:29)
8. Asselefetch Ashine and Getenseh Kebret - Metche new (3:33)
9. Getatchew Mekurya - Gedamay (3:48)










        The arrangements and bands are ably handled by Mulatu Astatke, Getatchew Mékurya and a hosts of other legends who have previously contributed to this ear opening series. 

     This series just blows our minds and any followers of Finders Keepers Turkish Psyche picks, the Sublime Frequencies series or indeed anything from Mulatu Astatke will want to invest without delay. 


        Essential !!




Wednesday, December 27, 2017

v.a. - Mitmitta Musika [ethiopia]









         Entire contet of this page is taken from Tumblr webpage of guy named DJ Mitmitta, or Kidus Berhanu or Vemund Hareide as he is titled in his Norwegian passport, and this blog post (from december 2013).



           He is true archaelogist of ethiopian vinyl and cassette releases and his devotion to rare ethiopian music is unique.






DJ Mitmitta



Curiosity and frustration can take you far. It has for Kidus Berhanu. Better known as DJ Mitmitta or Vemund Hareide as he is titled in his Norwegian passport, these virtues have taken him all the way from Oslo to the Ethiopian countryside. For Kidus, it all started with a frustration with the uniformity of Western music. A frustration that fed his curiosity to discover the yet undiscovered musical treasures of Ethiopia and led to a commitment to archive and spread the joy of Ethiopian music. This has since materialized in countless travels across the country to collect cassettes with traditional Ethiopian music and the Ethiojazz of the 60s and 70s, and in the founding of Mitmitta Music Shop in 2010 (The shop is currently closed but Kidus is hoping to reopen in a few months at a new location in town.)

This is a journey not unlike others. Awesome Tapes’ Brian Shimkovitz, Sahels Sounds’ Christopher Kirkley and labels such as Soundway, Analog Africa and Sublime Frequencies have embarked on similar voyages. But what distinguish the musical odyssey of Kidus is not only its East African focus. It is also its material character and the focus on the local market opposed to international distribution. For Kidus, the modus operandi has not been spreading the music through a blog nor through reissuing old vinyl records. Not yet. The approach has instead been one of collecting, cataloguing and digitalizing.

The Archaeology of Cassettes 


More than anything, Kidus’ project is an endeavor into musical archaeology and ethnography. And it’s a project focused on and redeemed through tapes (his cassette collection now numbers more than a thousand different Ethiopian tapes). As he explains: “Vinyl is hyped. And tapes are still a popular format. In Ethiopia, a lot of the good old music was never issued on vinyl or on CD.”  However, the predominance of cassettes also makes Kidus’ point to one of several caveats in the music industry and to an irony in his own project. Because while the cassette is his preferred format, it was exactly the spread of the cassette in the late 70’s and onwards that exterminated numerous record labels in Ethiopia and on the rest of continent and gave way for cheaper productions and musicians being replaced by a single synthesizer.

In Ethiopia, the record producers and music shop owners could buy one master tape and then easily duplicate this via cheap blank tapes. An early form of musical piracy that resulted in low quality recordings, unduly low prices and a situation where great Ethiopian artists such as Tilahun Gessesse or Mahmoud Ahmed received only a one-off payment and no benefits of potential future distributions. This however can possibly change with the introduction of a new copyright law in Ethiopia in 2010 that led to many music-shop owners being jailed for copying music for piracy purposes.











Ethiopian Music as off-limit for Ethiopians


Another and somewhat bizarre consequence of the functioning of the Ethiopian music industry prior to the 2010 copyright legislation is that today only very few Ethiopians have access to legal copies of the old Ethiopian recordings. Alemayehu Eshete, Muluken Mellese, Getachew Kassa and other of the artist that have become globally renowned through the Ethiopiques series are simply not legally accessible for the majority of Ethiopians.


Kidus is hoping this will change. He spends lots of time nagging the distributors to re-distribute their old releases, trying to convince them that these records will sell again. The problem is often that the covers are out of print and to make it profitable for distributors they would need to reprint at least 1-2000 covers. But his mission of making Ethiopian music available for both the foreign and the Ethiopian music audience does not stop here. He will soon be releasing a recording of Amharic wedding music from 1973 on both cassette AND vinyl. At the same time he dreams of expanding the geographical focus of his work by collecting, sustaining and distributing old Eritrean, Somali and Sudanese music.







Aster Aweke & Wubishet Fisseha





The Regionalization of Ethiopian music


While music from the rest of Africa has a strong appeal to Kidus, there is and will probably never be something quite like the tunes of Ethiopia for him. After spending part of his childhood in Ethiopia, he returned to Addis briefly as a teenager. The past few years he has spent travelling back and forth between Norway and Ethiopia, between studies, work and cassette hunting. He now spends most of his time in Ethiopia and is fluent in Amharic, the official Ethiopian language. His fascination of Ethiopian music has several roots, as he describes: “The Ethiopians really value their music and even today Ethiopian music is closely linked to the cultural traditions of the country. In addition, the great variation in the music of Ethiopia’s different regions really appeals to me.”

The vast regional difference in Ethiopian musical tradition is something that also poses a challenge to his ethno-musical investigations. The best music of Tigray or Oromiya is not found in Addis but in the music shops in provincial Ethiopia. Kidus highlights the Tzeta music shop in Dessie and the Negarit shop in Dire Dawa as the best music shops outside and the places to find respectively old Tigray, Amhara and Oromo music. He further explains the initial reception of the old music shop owners when a young pale Scandinavian walks into their domain and asks for cassettes with old – and for many Ethiopian also forgotten – artists: “At first they are quite suspicious. But quickly suspicion turns into excitement and appreciation. Mutual appreciation of and gratitude for a joint effort to preserve an important heritage.” 



The Faranji Connoisseur

Many of these grand old men of Ethiopian music – collectors, producers and music shop owners – have since become close friends of Kidus. And Kidus himself has become a renowned connoisseur of Ethiopian music. The go-to-guy for advice and expertise on the music and the music scene of Ethiopia. A position very few faranjis (meaning foreigners in Amharic) can credibly claim. And not an easy position to achieve taking into consideration the relative isolation of Ethiopia and its music during the past century. Nevertheless, Kidus still sees himself as a foreigner in Ethiopia and its music industry and he is aware of the challenges that this poses to him.

Although the emphasis in Kidus’ efforts has mainly on the Ethiopian artists of the past, he has also witnessed on first-hand the changes in the contemporary music scene in Addis (link to Jazzamba article). Changes of both the encouraging and less positive kind. The revival of Ethiojazz has led to an explosion of live music in Addis the last few years: “All clubs want their own band now and there is a lot of talent out there, which is good. Unfortunately, many of the new bands are afraid of experimenting. This is also the case for many of the European or American bands that have started playing Ethiojazz. Many of them are simply trying to copy the success of Mulatu Astatke.” 






Umar Suleeyman



        There are of course exemptions to this trend and Kidus points to the Nubian Arc as one of the most experimental and forward-looking bands around (see further recommendations from Kidus below).

       Kidus concludes by highlighting a more remarkable effect of the renewed interest in Ethiopian music. According to Kidus the new golden era of Ethiopian music has substantially changed the image of Ethiopia and provided the outside world with a new impression of what Ethiopia is in cultural terms. And Kidus is here to make sure that the insight of foreigners and Ethiopians into the unique musical treasures of Ethiopia will grow and proliferate for years to come.





01 - Aster Aweke & Wubishet Fisseha - Gum Gum (7:11)
02 - Teferra Kassa (3:47)
03 - Frew Hailu (4:15)
04 - Mullumebet Mishel (3:49)
05 - Muhammed Awel (8:24)
06 - Ali Mohammed Birra - Siwaamu Hin Awwaattu (5:09)
07 - Ali Mohammed Birra - Hammalelee Acoustic (5:44)
08 - Aster Aweke - Ante Ledj (8:10)
09 - Umar Suleeyman (5:06)
10 - Ayalew Mesfin (3:20)
11 - Muluken Melese (7:28)
12 - Besrat Hailu & Itiyopia Girma Mariam with 
        Eritrea Police Orchestra - Ashagedaw (4:22)
13 - Ali Shebo (6:32)
14 - Abetew Kebede - Chimchim Gonna (5:23)
15 - Umar Suleeyman - Bilisumma (4:37)
16 - Ali Mohammed Birra - Yaboontuu (5:24)
17 - Halo Dawe - Yashola Leki (5:39)
18 - Umar Alii Faarah - Loshee Intala (5:02)
19 - Omar Souleyman (7:22)
20 - Cut Chemist - Adidas to Addis (2:53)
21 - Cut Chemist - Track 2 (9:26)
22 - Brothers Stereo Jigjiga - Hadagan Nimcooy (6:25)
23 - Umar Alii Faarah - Ajaba Bontuu Oromo (5:14)
24 - Alemayehu Eshete (5:29)
25 - Wollo Lalibela Kinet (3:27)
26 - Osman Sayem aka. EthioJazz - Kelemwa (0:53)




Sunday, December 24, 2017

v.a. - Nahom Favorites, Vol. 36 [2017] [ethiopia]















Michael Lemma Demissew - ደስ ብላኛለች







01 - Girma Tefera — Man Neber (4:55)
02 - Michael Lemma Demissew — Des Blagnalech (3:20)
03 - Abeba Desalegn — Hiywet Ende Shekl (4:38)
04 - Alemayehu Hirbo — Bekum Kafekrshng (5:42)
05 - Bezuayehu Demisse — Che Blew (3:53)
06 - Aster Kebede — Akal Gela (6:31)
07 - Getachew Kassa — Yekereme Fiki (4:07)
08 - Neway Debebe — Yefikir Gedam (4:07)
09 - Kennedy Mengesha — Bemela New (6:10)
10 - Michael Lemma Demissew — Keandu Biet Andu Biet (2:42)
11 - Alemayehu Hirbo — Yefikren Engocha (5:45)
12 - Abeba Desalegn — Beatu Betie Belay (4:47)
13 - Michael Lemma Demissew — Mekeyershin Salawk (2:46)
14 - Alemayehu Hirbo — Nigerenge (4:01)
15 - Kennedy Mengesha — Wub Endachi Yelem (4:21)
16 - Aster Kebede — Ante Amele Tiru (5:32)
17 - Girma Tefera — Tilagne Eko Hedech (3:30)



Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Yemane G.Michael - Yemane Barya [1997] [eritrea]




   R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   

















            Yemane Ghebremichael (commonly known as Yemane Baria), was a well-known Eritrean songwriter, composer and singer. Not confined to musical pursuits, Yemane was also heavily involved in Eritrean politics. He died of natural causes in 1997.

       Yemane's songwriting strove to reflect what he perceived to be Eritrean experience during the Eritrean War of Independence. His songs were dotted with stories of love, journey, hope, immigration, and liberation. In 1975 he was jailed for the perceived political interpretation of one of his songs.

      A few years after the declaration of the independence of Eritrea, Yemane moved to Asmara and continued to release albums that reflected the new era of hope and national prosperity, with a mix of African and Latin melodies. He also sang about the people involved in the movement towards Eritrean independence, and the sacrifices of that movement.

       Yemane was also known as the 'Eritrean caretaker' due to his reputation as being of a generous, down-to-earth nature, and for sharing his place with newly arrived Eritreans. He is known to having helped many Eritreans adjust to diaspora life in Sudan and move to better places in the Middle East, America, Europe, etc. He was known for his deep sense of artistry and mastery of Tigrinya, the most widely used Eritrean language.



read more about Yemane Barya :









Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Tilahun Gessesse - Tilahun Gessesse Vol 1 & 2 [2001] [ethiopia]





                       R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   






















Volume 1

01. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Alchalkum (5:15)
02. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Engudaye Neshi (5:08)
03. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Fikir Lebechaye (4:14)
04. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Meleyayet Mot New (4:17)
05. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Migibima Motlwal (3:32)
06. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Monalisaye Neshi (5:55)
07. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Sema (4:18)
08. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Yehiywote Hiywot (4:32)
09. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Yene Mastwawesha (5:26)








Volume 2


01. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Akal Aynishin (7:33)
02. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Bemisht Chereka (4:48)
03. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Ere Men Yeshalegnal (5:33)
04. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Ewdish Neber (5:40)
05. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Hulunem Neger Ayichewalehu (4:35)
06. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Japanwan WoDJe (7:19)
07. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Min Largechew (4:59)
08. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Min Yilalu Sewoch (3:50)
09. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Ououta Ayaskefam (5:09)
10. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Satewadegne Wodijayat (4:12)
11. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Tiz Alegn Yetentu (4:24)
12. Tlahoun Gèssèssè - Yehiyote Ater Nesh (4:09)


Sunday, April 9, 2017

v.a. - Beyond Addis 02 [Modern Ethiopian Dance Grooves Inspired By Swinging Addis] [2016]














Anbessa Orchestra - Lions





01. Karl Hector & The Malcouns - Kingdom of D'mt 3:15 
02. The Daktaris - Musicawi Silt 3:04 
03. The Sorcerers - Cave of Brahma 3:39 
04. Debre Damo Dining Orchestra - Yesega Wat 2:56 
05. Jungle By Night - Ethiopino 3:32 
06. Onom Agemo And The Disco Jumpers - Cool Runnings 5:16 
07. Tezeta Band - The Viper 4:09 
08. Akalé Wubé feat. Manu Dibango - Anbessa 3:42 
09. The Transgressors - The Biz 3:02 
10. Les Frères Smith - Zilzil 7:21 
11. The Whitefield Brothers - Safari Strut 3:21 
12. Cosmic Analog Ensemble - Stuzzicadenti 2:23 
13. Karl Hector & The Malcouns - Followed Path 4:47 
14. Anbessa Orchestra - Lions 4:50




Thursday, April 6, 2017

v.a. - ETH [2017] [ethiopia]













Aselefech Ashine & Getenesh Kebret - Metche New





Tsehay Hailu - 01 - Eshururu [Ethiopian Lullaby] (0:55)
Argaw Bedaso - 02 - Alem Birre Ney Ney (4:34)
Selamawit Gabre Selassie - 03 - Ahun Dekemesk Agebaye (2:41)
Telela Kebede - 04 - Kelemawa (3:11)
Teferi Feleqe - 05 - Kelkiyilgne (4:12)
Issatu Tessema - 06 - Ayamaru Eshete (4:00)



Alemayehu Borobor - 07 - Tez Aleng Hagere (3:29)
Besrat Hailu & Itiyopia Girma Mariam  - 08 - Ashagedaw (4:22)
Mulugeta Tlahun & Negash Tekie - 09 - Yewyen Abebaie (2:56)
Negash Tekie - 10 - Atibreie (3:51)
Assegedetch Kassa - 11 - Marewa (4:16)
Belaynesh Wubante and Assegedetch Asfaw - 12 - Alemiye (2:37)



Aselefech Ashine & Getenesh Kebret - 13 - Metche New (3:32)
Teferra Kassa - 14 - no info (3:47)
Bezuayene Zegeye - 15 - Woinai (3:59)
Tadele Bekele - 16 - Enafiqishalew (2:53)
Wubshaw Sileshi - 17 - Yih New Getinet (3:24)
Tamrat Ferengi - 18 - Anchin Yagegnulet (4:03)



Selomon Shibeshi - 19 - Endet Zenegashiw (4:06)
Wubeshet Fisseha - 20 - Maleda (3:13)
Munaye Menberu - 21 - Gublie (4:31)
Telela Kebede - 22 - YeTizita Roro (4:00)
Tigist Shibabaw - 23 - Eshururu (3:20)




Tuesday, April 4, 2017

v.a. - Gurage Beats [ethiopia]











       The Gurage people are a Semitic-speaking ethnic group inhabiting Ethiopia. According to the 2007 national census, its population is 6,867,377 people, of whom 792,659 are urban dwellers. 

This is 5.53% of the total population of Ethiopia, or 9.52% of the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region (SNNPR).








Hailu Fereja - Esherrerre
(Guragigna Music)





          The Gurage people traditionally inhabit a fertile, semi-mountainous region in southwest Ethiopia, about 125 kilometers southwest of Addis Ababa, bordering the Awash River in the north, the Gibe River (a tributary of the Omo River) to the southwest, and Lake Zway in the east. In addition, according to the 2007 Ethiopian national census the Gurage can also be found in large numbers in Addis Ababa, Oromia Region, Dire Dawa, Harari Region, Somali Region, Amhara Region, Gambela Region, Benishangul-Gumuz Region, and Tigray Region.

             The groups that are subsumed under the term Gurage originated in the Tigray region of Ethiopia as the descendants of military conquerors during the Aksumite empire. The Gurage languages, which are not always mutually intelligible, belong to the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family. Some of these have been influenced by neighbouring Cushitic languages. The Gurage are mainly Christian—members largely of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church—and Muslim.


              Settled agriculturalists, the Gurage centre their lives on the cultivation of their staple crop, the Ethiopian, or false, banana (Ensete ventricosum), prized not for its “false” (or inedible) fruit but for its roots.


                The languages spoken by the Gurage are known as the Gurage languages. The variations among these languages are used to group the Gurage people into three dialectically varied subgroups: Northern, Eastern and Western. However, the largest group within the Eastern subgroup, known as the Silt'e, identify foremost as Muslims.





01 - Aster Aweke - Ebo (8:02)
02 - Mahmoud Ahmed - Gichamue (4:38)
03 - Ashenafi Zeberga - Sriway (5:55)
04 - Behailu Kassahun - Ayo Eshururu (5:38)
05 - Biruk Befekadu - Sebelbelata (3:59)
06 - Ashenafi Zeberga - Segele (4:56)
07 - Mikiyas Negussie - Be3ste (4:51)
08 - Reshad Kedir - Amama (4:46)
09 - Yared Negu - Yemerkato Arada (3:56)
10 - Mykey Shewa - Aegba (ኤግባ) (4:15)
11 - Mewded Kibru - Yawe Way (5:57)
12 - Teddy Yo - Guragaeton (3:55)
13 - Desalegn Mersha - Waywato (5:16)
14 - Jossy Gebre - SebenSema (4:44)
15 - Hailu Fereja - Esherrerre (5:21)
16 - Feleke Maru - Ker (4:51)
17 - Wendi Mak - Yene Mar (5:26)
18 - Temesgen Gebrgziabeher - Yemeskel Let Mata (5:36)